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Save Christians Of The Middle East

Widad issued a statement today in support of the Christians of the Middle East.

“I am heartbroken by the cruel slaughter of Christians in Egypt. We call on world leaders to protect Christians of the Middle East from systematic persecution… It’s tragic that the Christians of the Middle East are being targeted repeatedly because of their religion. The persecution of Coptic Christians, which is the largest Christian community in the Middle East, has been going on for years… Egypt’s declared state of emergency didn’t prevent this senseless act of terror.”

 

 

Dr. Widad Akreyi said today she was devastated and heartbroken by the cruel slaughter of Christians in Egypt, calling on world leaders to protect Christians of the Middle East from persecution.

“I am devastated and heartbroken by the cruel slaughter of Christians in Egypt. We call on world leaders to protect Christians of the Middle East from systematic persecution,” Widad said in a statement.

At least 29 Coptic Christians, including women and children, were massacred on 26 May 2017 when assailants wearing military-style uniforms and masks fired on their buses heading for the St. Samuel Monastery in the Minya governorate south of Cairo. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack that left at least 25 people wounded, several in critical condition.

“We are mourning the victims of this atrocious crime. Today we saw, once again, how Christians are forced to live a different life than the one they have been dreaming of. Today we saw children wanting to open the coffins of their parents for a last hug,” she said.

The Coptic Christian community comprises about 10-15% of Egypt’s population of 91 million, with the majority belonging to the Coptic Orthodox Church.

Widad added: “It’s tragic that the Christians of Egypt and those of the Middle East are being targeted again and again because of their religion. The systematic persecution of Coptic Christians, which is the largest Christian community in the Middle East, has been going on for years. For instance, in 2013, a church in the same area was torched. In 2015, the kidnapped Christians in Libya were dragged off by militants affiliated with ISIS, and dressed in orange jumpsuits, they were forced to kneel before being savagely beheaded. In December 2016, another attack targeted a Coptic church attached to the St. Mark’s Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in Cairo, leaving at least 25 people dead and dozens injured.”

Last month, on Palm Sunday, twin suicide attacks rocked the Coptic churches in the cities of Alexandria and Tanta, where as many as over 45 lost their lives and another 120 were injured. The attacks prompted President al-Sissi to declare a three-month state of emergency.

“Egypt’s three-month state of emergency declared after the Palm Sunday attacks didn’t prevent this senseless act of terror. Given Egypt’s failure to provide security in the face of widespread intolerance, Coptic Christians need international protection,” said Widad.

Issued on 27 May 2017